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Leeward CC: An ʻĀina-based research guide: Ola Waiʻanae: Ka Moku o Waiʻanae

This section serves as a starting point for your research into the history and traditions of the moku of Waiʻanae.  Leeward Community College's education center is located in the area of Māʻili within the ʻAhupuaʻa of Lualualei, which is a part of the Moku of Waiʻanae.  Some of the rich stories of this ʻāina can be found within the resources below but no doubt there is much more to explore through your own research. Ola Waiʻanae i ka Makani Kaiāulu! (ʻōN #2495)

Tips for Searching Primo

When searching through the catalog, the following subject headings might be helpful for your search: 

Additionally, you can narrow your search by using the names of individual land divisions such as the following ahupuaʻa names: Nānākuli, Lualualei, Waiʻanae, Mākaha, Keaʻau, ʻŌhikilolo, Mākua, Kahanahāiki, Keawaʻula; Or individual wahi pana such as: Kaʻala (Mt), Kaʻena, Kūlaʻilaʻi, Kāneʻakī, Kūʻilioloa, Pōkaʻī, Puʻuheleakalā, etc. Note that sometimes diacritical markings (ʻokina and kahakō) are not present in the catalog. To be safe, it is recommended that you search names twice, once with diacritical markings and once without.

Primo

books and other materials in the library collection, as well as articles, e-books, and videos from the library's research databases.

 

Or go directly to Primo Search for more options.

Moʻolelo o Waiʻanae: Books from the Library Catalog

Articles & Book Chapters

Fujikane, C. (2020). Mapping Wonder in Lualualei on the Huakaʻi Kākoʻo no Waiʻanae Environmental Justice Bus Tour. In Detours (pp. 340–350). Duke University Press. 

Mei-Singh, L., & Mullins-Ibrahim, S. K. (2020). Fences and Fishing Nets: Conflicting Visions of Stewardship for Ka‘ena and Mākua. In Detours (pp. 271–282). Duke University Press. https://doi.org/10.1515/9781478007203-031

Dixon, B., Gosser, D., & Williams, S. S. (2008). Traditional Hawaiian Men's Houses and their Socio-Political Context in Lualualei, Leeward West Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi. Journal of the Polynesian Society, 117(3), 267–295.

Kalamaoka‘āina Niheu. (2014). Pu‘uhonua: Sanctuary and Struggle at Makua. In A Nation Rising (p. 161–). Duke University Press. https://doi.org/10.2307/j.ctv11cw7h9.16

Community Organizations

This section contains the website and contact information for a number of organizations that are dedicated to the Waiʻanae community through conservation, restoration, and education. These are some organizations that you might consider collaborating with within the scope of your work here at Leeward. Some examples include research assignments, service trips, or program partnerships. Remember: Leeward CC is a part of the Waiʻanae community too! As you reach out to these groups, consider ways that you are not only utilizing their resources but also supporting their goals through service, funding, or other reciprocal means of collaboration

E ola loa ka moku o Waiʻanae!

Waiʻanae Moku Education Center

Prosecutor candidates kick off public series at Leeward's Waiʻanae Moku |  University of Hawaiʻi System News

Media from the Library Catalog

Hawaiian Values Project: No. 486 (Hawaiʻi Foundation For History and the Humanities)

Above: Fred Cachola, Papa Louis Aila, Edward Kealanahele Iopa, and Howard Hayes at Kūʻīlioloa Heiau in Waiʻanae, Oʻahu as featured in the Hawaiʻi Foundation for History and the Humanities Series. Screenshot is taken from "Kuʻilioloa pt. 2"; In addition to the interviews done at Kūʻīlioloa Heiau and Kāneʻaki Heiau, the UH Catalog also includes streaming access to footage taken in other places across the islands.

Maps

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